Local Assets

Posted by Dave Fratello on Tuesday, January 27th, 2009 at 7:44pm.

Tuesday night, the MB City Council awarded commemorative plaques to 5 homes that have been designated the city's first "culturally significant landmark" homes.

Heading up the pack is a distinctive home at 3004 The Strand, built in 1960, which features a glass and copper exterior and unique, moderne interior as well. (Pic via this Daily Breeze article.) It's said to be the first steel-constructed home on the Strand.

Just the other day, the Strand property also won designation as a state landmark.

It is only the second state-designated landmark in town, with the MB Pier being the first.

The other homes, most much older than the Strand landmark, to have received local landmark status are listed below. (Descriptions provided by MB Community Development Dept.) (Click thumbnail to enlarge photo.)




1220 N. Ardmore
– Built in 1918, Victorian style with original bracket detail and wood shingles.






133 13th
– Built in 1922, California Bungalow, interior crown molding, stained glass windows and original attic and cellar.






669 33rd
– Built in 1937, French Normandy Tudor cottage style referred to as the "Hansel and Gretel" house, round tower, rolled edges roof.






2500 Pine
– Built in 1950, adobe mud brick style referred to as "Deardens Casa Bougainvillea," beamed ceilings, wall board edges.




A few observations:

No life east of Hwy. 1: All the landmark homes are west of Sepulveda.

Corner me: All except the Strand home are on corner lots.

No stapled-on stone: Mud brick qualifies, but not stacked stone. Hmmm. And in 50 years?
The city "landmark" designation is completely voluntary – people can nominate their own properties or public properties, and the status does not interfere with property rights (i.e., restricting development). (See the MB city page on landmarks.)

There are several more MB homes under consideration for landmark status, and several other non-residential properties as well.

Our top choice among those now in the pipeline: Ercole's.
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